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Statement on the 100th Anniversary of the Passage of the 19th Amendment

Updated: Jun 23, 2019

Brianna Patterson - Brianna_Patterson@cardin.senate.gov

Maddy Hornbuckle - Maddy_Hornbuckle@manchin.senate.gov


WASHINGTON D.C. - “On June 4, 2019, we recognized the 100th anniversary of the Senate passage of the 19th amendment, which affirmed women’s constitutional right to vote and laid out the path to voting recognition for Black women in America.


As we celebrate the many doors the 19th Amendment opened a century ago, we must remain aware of the obstacles Black women overcame to participate in the democratic process.


Throughout the early 20th century, racists and opponents to progress used Jim Crow laws – poll taxes, literacy tests, violence, and intimidation – to supplant the 19th Amendment and keep Black women from the ballot. These Jim Crow laws continued their pervasive oppression of Black women for 46 long years after the passage of the 19th Amendment. It would not be until Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that all legal impediments at the state and local level were struck down and Black women were finally able to vote without fear of persecution.


A century later, we are proud to celebrate Congress’ initiative and the countless Black women who were bruised and violently beaten so all women could participate in our political process. However, subtle and blatant vestiges of Jim Crow are still remnant, and it is up to all of us to work together to ensure insidious practices of voter discrimination are completely removed.


Thank you to all who paved the path we are walking on. Your sacrifices will never be forgotten.”

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